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TfL Press Release – The Mayor and TfL seek views of the taxi and private hire trade on world’s first Ultra Low Emission Zone

27/10/2014

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27 October 2014

The Mayor and TfL seek views of the taxi and private hire trade on world’s first Ultra Low Emission Zone

· The Ultra Low Emission Zone (ULEZ) would significantly reduce the number of people living in areas of poor air quality in London

  • Scheme would at least halve total emissions of nitrogen oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM10) from vehicle exhausts in central London (taxi emissions of PM10 would reduce by 71 per cent)
  • Proposal that all taxis and new private hire vehicles presented for licensing from 1 January 2018 would need to be zero emission capable
  • Proposal to reduce the maximum age limit of non zero emission capable taxis to 10 years
  • Mayor and TfL are proposing a specific fund to assist taxi drivers to replace their vehicles
  • TfL in regular dialogue with Office for Low Emission Vehicles to ensure their new £500m scheme specifically supports taxi and PHV drivers to purchase zero emission capable vehicles, including charging infrastructure

The Mayor and Transport for London (TfL) are seeking the views of the taxi and private hire trades as they launch a public consultation on proposals to introduce the world’s first Ultra Low Emission Zone (ULEZ) in the capital on 7 September 2020, to significantly improve air quality and in turn the health of Londoners.

The ULEZ consultation, which runs from today (Monday 27 October) until Friday 9 January 2015, is available online at www.tfl.gov.uk/ultra-low-emission-zone

The groundbreaking proposals would require all vehicles travelling within the Congestion Charge zone to meet new emission standards and would be in operation 24 hours a day, seven days a week.  To help meet these new standards, the Mayor and TfL are proposing to introduce a specific fund to assist taxi drivers to replace their vehicles.

Taxis are responsible for a large amount of harmful emissions in the capital owing to their high mileage and the dominance of diesel within the fleet.  By 2020, taxis will be the second largest contributor to NOx and the largest contributor to PM10 emissions from road transport in central London.

The specific proposals relating to the taxi trade are:

  • A requirement that all taxis presented for licensing in the capital from 1 January 2018 would need to be zero emission capable (minimum zero emissions range of 30 miles and maximum CO2 emissions of 50g/km).  Alongside further significant investment in the TfL bus fleet, this would create demonstrator fleets in London, boost industry sales and lead the transition towards this technology;
  • Reducing the maximum age limit for non zero emission capable taxis from 15 to 10 years from 2020 – this would reduce the total NOx emissions from taxis by 45 per cent, reduce PM10 emissions by 71 per cent and CO2 emissions by 36 per cent across London.  It would remove the oldest and most polluting vehicles from the fleet and help accelerate the uptake of zero emission capable taxis, which would retain a 15 year age limit to recognise they are far less polluting. The 10 year age limit for private hire vehicles would remain the same.

In addition to proposing a fund to help taxi drivers replace their vehicles, TfL has been in regular dialogue with the Office for Low Emission Vehicles to ensure their new £500m funding allocation specifically supports taxi and PHV drivers to purchase zero emission capable vehicles, as well as supporting a fund for on-street rapid charging infrastructure.

The specific proposals relating to the private hire trade are:

  • A requirement that all newly manufactured private hire vehicles presented for licensing in the capital from 1 January 2018 would need to be zero emission capable (minimum zero emissions range of 30 miles and maximum CO2 emissions of 50g/km). Second-hand vehicles presented for licensing at this time would need to meet the ULEZ standards, which are dependent on its vehicle type (Euro 4 petrol, Euro 6/VI diesel);
  • Regardless of licensing requirements, PHVs would still need to be ULEZ compliant if driving in central London – so meet Euro 6 emissions standards (diesel) or Euro 4 (petrol).  Non-compliant vehicles could still drive in the zone but they would be required to pay a daily charge of £12.50; all taxis would be exempt from this requirement.

The Mayor of London, Boris Johnson, said: “As part of my proposals to introduce the world’s first Ultra Low Emission Zone, I want to support the transition of London’s taxi trade to the next generation of zero emission capable vehicles, with new funds to help drivers switch. Introducing the world’s first Ultra Low Emission Zone is an essential measure to improve London’s air quality, reduce NO2 and help protect the health and well-being of all Londoners. Working together we can put the taxi industry on a long-term sustainable footing while improving the air that we all breathe.”

Michèle Dix, Managing Director of Planning at TfL, added: “TfL has worked very closely with the taxi and private hire trade, alongside all other key stakeholders, to ensure we captured their feedback as the ULEZ proposals took shape.  We would now welcome their comments on the final proposals as set out in the public consultation.

“We understand that the proposals to reduce the taxi age limit to 10 years will mean that some taxi drivers will have to replace their existing vehicles earlier than anticipated.  That is why we are proposing a specific fund and working with the Government to help those drivers, enabling them to purchase newer, cleaner taxis.”

The ULEZ will also ensure London’s air quality improves more quickly, making the capital a more pleasant place to live, visit and work, and encourage the use of more sustainable forms of transport.

The ULEZ is projected to halve emissions of nitrogen oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM10) from vehicle exhausts.  This means more than 80 per cent of central London is expected to meet the NO2 annual legal limits in 2020.  The ULEZ would also lead to a significant reduction in the number of people living in areas of poor air quality (where levels of NO2 exceed legal limits) – by 74 per cent in central London, 51 per cent in inner London and 43 per cent in outer London.

NO2 is a gas which in high concentrations can cause breathing problems and increase asthma symptoms, with research suggesting that children and young people are most adversely affected as high concentrations of the gas restrict lung growth.  The number of care homes, hospitals and schools exposed to high levels of NO2would be halved across London.  These positive effects will be especially beneficial to the young, older people and those who have respiratory problems as well as residents of high pollution areas.

After the consultation closes, TfL will analyse the results of the consultation and make a recommendation to the Mayor.  As the licensing authority for London’s taxis and private hire vehicles, TfL will decide whether to make changes to the licensing requirement for these vehicles.

The Mayor will then make a decision on whether to confirm the scheme order (setting the ULEZ emissions standards and non compliance charges), with or without modifications.

Subject to confirmation in spring 2015, this would effectively provide three years advance notice of the licensing proposals (2018) and five years for the ULEZ vehicle emission proposals (September 2020).

ENDS

Additional information

· In January 2012, a 15 year age limit was introduced for taxis along with a requirement that all newly licensed taxis must meet, as a minimum, the Euro 5 emissions standard.  As a result, around 6,000 of the most polluting taxis have been removed from the London fleet.

· A second-hand PHV is considered to be older than 18 months old from date of first registration.

· More details on the main elements of OLEV’s £500 million package to support the development and use of ultra low emission vehicles in the UK, which was announced in April 2014, is available here:https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/ultra-low-emission-vehicles-in-the-uk-measures-to-support-use-and-development-2015-to-2020

· The ULEZ proposals would require vehicles travelling in central London to meet the following emissions standards, or pay a daily charge:

- Cars and small vansEuro 6 for diesel engines (registered from 1 September 2015 so 5 years old or less in 2020) and Euro 4 for petrol engines (registered from 1 January 2006 so 14 years old or less in 2020).  Non-compliant vehicles could still drive in the zone but they would be required to pay a daily charge of £12.50;

- Large vans and minibuses Euro 6 for diesel engines (registered from 1 September 2016 so 4 years old or less in 2020) and Euro 4 for petrol engines (registered from 1 January 2007 so 13 years old or less in 2020). Non-compliant vehicles would be required to pay a daily charge of £12.50;

- Heavy goods vehicles, buses and coachesEuro VI (registered from 1 January 2014 so 6 years old or less in 2020).  Non- compliant vehicles would be required to pay a daily charge of £100;

- Motorcycles and similar vehicles – Euro 3 (registered from 1 July 2007 so 13 years old or less in 2020).  Non-compliant vehicles would be required to pay a daily charge of £12.50.

· As part of the ULEZ proposal, TfL is working to reduce emissions from its buses alongside taxis and private hire vehicles and to increase the number of zero emission capable vehicles.  This will create demonstrator fleets in London, boost industry sales and lead the transition towards this technology.

· By 2020, all double deck buses operating in central London will be hybrid and all single deck buses will be zero emission (at point of use).  This will require substantial investment by TfL and will mean nearly all double deck buses operating in inner London are hybrid and many in outer London too.

· The World Health Organisation (WHO) has identified a number of pollutants as a major public health concern.  The two pollutants of principal concern in London are Particulate Matter (PM10) and Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2). London is now compliant with PM limit values owing to the Low Emission Zone, taxi and private hire vehicle age limits, bus retrofit schemes and the natural turnover of vehicles. However, London is not forecast to meet the legal limits for NO2 until after 2030 – alongside Birmingham and Leeds – unless targeted action is taken.

· Since the Mayor was elected, the number of people living in areas exceeding NO2 limits has halved but there is a clear need to take further action. The Greater London Authority (GLA) and TfL estimate that a reduction in road transport emissions of around 70 per cent is needed for central London to meet EU legal limits for NO2 in 2020, with the ULEZ delivering around two-thirds of this. In addition to road transport, buildings and construction activity contribute significantly to London’s air pollution. Further reductions from these sources would also help bring compliance forward.

· The ULEZ proposals are projected to achieve a reduction in nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from road transport in central London of up to 51 per cent broken down as: TfL buses (74 per cent), taxis (45 per cent), HGVs (48 per cent), non-TfL buses and coaches (50 per cent), cars (42 per cent), vans (38 per cent) and motorcycles (15 per cent). It would also achieve a 64 per cent reduction in PM10 and a 15 per cent reduction in CO2 from road transport in central London.

· Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is a gas, which at high enough concentrations can cause inflammation of the airways and long-term exposure can affect lung function and respiratory systems. It can also increase asthma symptoms. Nitrogen oxide (NOx) is primarily made up of two pollutants, nitric oxide (NO) and NO2 and refers to total vehicle emissions (both those directly emitted and those formed by chemical reactions). Vehicle emissions standards refer to total NOx emissions but EU air quality limit values refer to ambient concentrations and are set for NO2 as this is the harmful component of the emissions.

· The ULEZ standards would be enforced using Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) cameras which are already used for the Congestion Charge. If the daily charge has not been paid then a Penalty Charge Notice (PCN) would be issued. It is proposed that for cars, vans and motorcycles this would be set at £130 (reduced to £65 if paid within 14 days) and for HGVs, coaches and buses it would be set at £1,000 (reduced to £500 if paid within 14 days) – so in line with the Congestion Charge and Low Emission Zone respectively.

· It is proposed that residents of the ULEZ will be granted a three year sunset period (until 6 September 2023) before any daily charge applies. This is to acknowledge that they are unable to avoid the zone and so may require more time to change their vehicle to meet the ULEZ standards.

· The proposals for a ULEZ are one of a raft of measures introduced by the Mayor and TfL to improve air quality in the capital, including:

- TfL published its Transport Emissions Road Map on 10 September 2014. It looks at how to reduce emissions from transport in London and reports on what TfL has already done and what it may do in the future. It provides a range of possible new measures that the Mayor, TfL, London boroughs, the Government, EU and other parties should consider to help meet the challenge of reducing air pollutants and CO2 emissions in London;

- Tightening the Low Emission Zone standards for HGVs, buses and coaches and introducing new standards for large vans and minibuses – around 150,000 vehicles needed to take action to meet these standards when they came into effect in January 2012;

- Reducing emissions by retrofitting more than 1,000 of the oldest buses with special equipment to reduce their NOx emissions by up to 88 per cent – with plans to increase this number to 1,800; 

- Retiring the remaining 900 oldest Euro III buses in TfL’s fleet and replacing them with super-clean Euro VI buses at a cost of £18m;

- Accelerating the roll out of hybrid buses, with 1,700 to be on the road by 2016, including 600 of the iconic New Routemasters Buses – equivalent to around 20 per cent of TfL’s bus fleet;

- Retiring around 6,000 of the oldest, most polluting taxis, by introducing London’s first taxi age limits;

- Introducing new measures to reduce emissions and clean up construction sites, including plans for tough new emission standards for construction equipment in 2015 and 2020;

- Investing almost £1 billion to improve cycling infrastructure and encourage less polluting forms of transport.  In February, research by the Medical Research Council suggested the health benefits gained from using the city’s Cycle Hire scheme outweigh the potential negative impacts from injuries and exposure to air pollution;

- Using the planning system to require all new development to be “air quality neutral”;

- Retrofitting hundreds of thousands of homes and public buildings with energy efficiency measures which reduce their emissions, with 400,000 already complete.

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Daily Mirror: Taxi driver in ‘first ever’ conviction for touting

25/10/2014

Oct 24, 2014 17:37 By Sam Rkaina

A cabbie has been convicted of touting for passengers in what is believed to be the first case of its kind.

Mirror survey: Should touting for passengers be a crime?  Click here to take part and read this story on the Mirror website ev

Sohail Masood, 34, put on a yellow high-vis jacket with ‘Book a Cab Here’ on the back and approached people at a train station, ahead of waiting black cab drivers.

A court heard he had already clashed with rival drivers outside the rail station in Milton Keynes, Bucks., on a previous occasion before he was arrested.

Masood, who owns Northants-based Starline Cabs, was found guilty of soliciting people for private vehicle hire.

It is believed to be the first time the Crown Prosecution Service has managed to secure a conviction for the charge, commonly known as ‘taxi touting.’

Dad-of-two Masood, from Milton Keynes, told the city’s magistrates: "The first time there was an incident between myself and taxi drivers there.

"The black cab drivers were not very happy about it. They were shouting and me and pushing me to try to stop me from what I was doing.

"I stayed calm and did not retaliate. I was just doing my job."

He said on that occasion police attended and calmed the situation down and told him to move on to diffuse the situation.

Masood insisted that he did not approach anyone and only booked taxis for customers to him who approached him – as the council had told him he could legally do.

But prosecutor Matthew Knight said: "You wore a high visibility jacket that said, book your cab here’.

"Which means that your actions were enticing people to come to you and book their taxi with your company."

Shiraz Rustom, defending, said Masood was a reputable businessman of good character.

He said: "Mr Masood faces losing his livelihood for something he made the effort to make several checks on about whether he would be breaking any laws. He believed his actions were within the law."

Masood was given an absolute discharge, meaning he faces no punishment because the magistrates said he had tried to find out if he would be acting within the law.

He was ordered to pay £150 court costs.

ENDS

More from Cab Trade News

Unite Campaign Victory: Government Clime-down On Taxi Deregulation

London’s Cabbies Take Their Fight To City Hall

London Taxi Drivers Demonstration 24th September 2014

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Women’s taxi safety fears increase after peers give go-ahead to deregulation clause

22/10/2014

Unite Press Release Wednesday 22 October 2014

Women’s safety when they use taxis and private hire vehicles was put in jeopardy when the House of Lords agreed a proposal that that will mean they could be collected by a ‘rogue’ operator  when they ordered a minicab.

Unite, the country’s largest union which represents many taxi drivers, condemned the decision by the peers to agreed clause 12 of the Deregulation Bill which will allow firms to sub-contract bookings to operators in a different district.

Unite said that that, in effect, this meant that a fare would be picked by a ‘rogue’ driver, at a time when – according to a Local Government Association survey –  80 per cent of women said they would  be concerned if they were collected by a minicab from a different firm from the one they had originally booked with.

Unite national taxi rep Tommy McIntyre said: “Public safety, especially as it affects women, has been seriously jeopardised by this decision which is a victory for the free market ideologues of this Tory-led government. Market forces should not be come before the safety of the public.

“In London, there are 25 sexual assaults by minicab drivers every week – last year, there were 287 assaults. We fear that this decision could mean that the number of assaults will dramatically increase in the capital and across the UK.

“We call on MPs to seriously rethink this issue when the bill returns to the House of Commons.”

Unite and other taxi trade unions, the Suzy Lamplugh Trust, the Survivors Trust, all 19 police commissioners, the Institute of Licensing, and the Local Government Association (LGA) had all opposed 12 clause

Lords Division Results

More…

Unite Campaign Victory: Government Clime-down On Taxi Deregulation

London’s Cabbies Take Their Fight To City Hall

London Taxi Drivers Demonstration 24th September 2014

Join Unite online

New minicab law ‘would put women at risk’

20/10/2014

 

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From the Independent

Safety charities, the police and taxi drivers oppose coalition’s proposed relaxation of rules

JANE MERRICK POLITICAL EDITOR Sunday 19 October 2014

Ministers will come under fresh pressure this week not to ease rules on minicabs, a relaxation that safety campaigners say would endanger vulnerable women.

The Government has quietly dropped one of the controversial measures in its Deregulation Bill, clause 10, which would have allowed anyone, even without a private-hire licence, to drive a minicab when it is “off duty”. The change could have enabled sexual predators to pass themselves off as taxi drivers.

Yet, with the bill set to be debated in the House of Lords this Tuesday, ministers are ploughing ahead with two other contentious measures: extending a minicab licence permit from one to two years, which opponents say would make it more difficult for councils to carry out checks on drivers; and a clause that would allow private-hire operators to subcontract a booking to another operator in a different local authority area.

Concerns about the licensing of private-hire taxis have been heightened by the Rotherham abuse scandal, as many of the abusers used minicabs to ferry their victims around the town.

The Shadow Transport Secretary, Mary Creagh, said it was important that the Government dropped the entire package of deregulation of private-hire licensing, because of the increased risk it could cause vulnerable women and girls. The Local Government Association (LGA) added: “Our own opinion polling shows that 80 per cent of women would be concerned if they booked a journey with one firm and a different one turned up.”

The Suzy Lamplugh Trust, 17 police and crime commissioners from all parties, the National Private Hire Association, the National Taxi Association, Rape Crisis and Women’s Aid are all against the measures in the Bill. The Suzy Lamplugh Trust says that sexual predators commonly pose as legitimate minicab drivers.

Ms Creagh said: “We welcome the Government’s climbdown on their disastrous proposal to deregulate taxis, which would have put women’s safety at risk. However, ministers are still pressing ahead with their risky plans to loosen taxi licensing and allow cabs to work out of area, which Labour, alongside safety charities, has opposed.

“Ministers need urgently to review these final two measures and we repeat our offer to work with them to get the rogues off the road.”

In her report from the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Exploitation in Rotherham, Alexis Jay concluded that “one of the common threats running through child sexual exploitation across England has been the prominent role of taxi drivers in being linked to children who were abused”. She argued against any weakening of regulations.

After clause 10 was dropped last week, Ann Lucas, the chairman of the LGA’s Safer and Stronger Communities Board, said: “When people get into a taxi, they put their trust in the fact that the person driving the car has been vetted and licensed and that it is safe to be in a vehicle with them – especially if they are travelling alone. The Government should also now delete the two remaining taxi clauses in the Deregulation Bill.”

The Government’s clauses do not apply to London, where private-hire licensing is regulated by Transport for London.

Ends.

More…

Unite Campaign Victory: Government Clime-down On Taxi Deregulation

London’s Cabbies Take Their Fight To City Hall

London Taxi Drivers Demonstration 24th September 2014

Join Unite online

French court fines Uber car service 100,000 euros

17/10/2014

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(Reuters) – A Paris court fined the French subsidiary of U.S. app-based ride service Uber 100,000 euros ($128,000) on Thursday for fraudulent business practices after it advertised its paid transportation service UberPop as a car pool.

UberPop, which the private company launched about a year ago in Paris, links private drivers with passengers. Called a "ride-sharing solution" by Uber, the service is now available in five other French cities.

The court ordered that Uber post Thursday’s ruling on its websites.

The San Francisco start-up said in a statement it would continue to operate UberPop while it appeals parts of the decision.

"This decision does not call into question the service," Uber France CEO Thibaud Simphal told Reuters. "They just have to set the conditions in which we can do it."

Courts in Germany have banned UberPop and the company’s low-cost limousine pick-up service UberBlack, saying their drivers do not comply with German law for the commercial transport of passengers.

Uber, which is available in 43 countries and was recently valued at $18 billion, has faced disputes with taxi operators and regulatory issues in many cities where it operates, including in San Francisco.

Taxi drivers in Paris blocked traffic into the city centre in a protest against Uber in June, action duplicated in London, Berlin and Madrid.

(Reporting By Chine Labbe. Writing by Alexandria Sage)

Unite Campaign Victory: Government Clime-down On Taxi Deregulation

15/10/2014

NEWS FROM LABOUR: We welcome the Government’s climb-down on their disastrous proposal to deregulate taxis, which would have put women’s safety at risk

Mary Creagh, Labour’s Shadow Transport Secretary, responding to the news that the Government have abandoned Clause 10 of the Deregulation Bill, said:

“We welcome the Government’s climb-down on their disastrous proposal to deregulate taxis, which would have put women’s safety at risk. However, Ministers are still pressing ahead with their risky plans to loosen taxi licensing and allowing cabs to work out of area, which Labour, alongside safety charities, has opposed.

“Ministers need urgently to review these final two measures and we repeat our offer to work with them to get the rogues off the road.”

June 2014: Unite cab trade delegation hands in thousands of petition leaflets opposing Government deregulation proposals to Labour MP’s Maria Eagle and Richard Burden

More on Government Deregulation plans

1. On 14 October DfT dropped Clause 10 from the Deregulation Bill

Clause 10 would have enabled people who don’t hold a private hire vehicle license to drive one when it is “off duty”. Safety campaigners and local government had warned this reform has the potential to increase the number of unlicensed drivers pretending to be legitimate.

http://services.parliament.uk/bills/2014-15/deregulation.html

2. The Government failed to publish an Impact Assessment until 8 months after the reforms were proposed

The taxi and minicab reforms were added to the Deregulation Bill in March 2014. But the Government didn’t publish an impact assessment on their rushed and risky reforms until Labour asked for one on the 1 October 2014. It confirmed that the reform ‘could lead to an increase in illegal use of licensed vehicles.’

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/id/ukia/2014/295

3. Campaigners, Police and Crime Commissioners, Local Government and the trade joined Labour in opposing the reforms

Organisations including the Suzy Lamplugh Trust and the Survivors Trust, the  Local Government Association, 17 cross-party police and crime commissioners and various industry bodies had opposed the reforms. Labour voted against the clauses in the Deregulation Bill at Report Stage in the Commons and will continue to oppose them in the House of Lords.

4. Remaining Taxi and Minicab Clauses of the Bill

Clause 11 of the Deregulation Bill will end annual license renewal for minicab drivers, which helps licensing authorities recognise changes to a drivers’ convictions or medical status. Clause 12 will enable minicab operators to subcontract a booking to another operator, licensed in a different area. Local licensing officers don’t currently have the powers to enforce safety in respect of vehicles in other areas.

5. Conclusions from Rotherham Report on Taxis and Minicabs

The Inquiry concluded that “one of the common threats running through child sexual exploitation across England has been the prominent role of taxi drivers in being linked to children who were abused.” The Inquiry found that young women in Rotherham immediately and consistently avoided taxis as a form of transport because of safety fears, and issued a clear warning about the poor enforcement powers of local licensing officers. The author of the Independent Inquiry into Rotherham, Alexis Jay OBE, has warned against attempt to water down taxi and minicab reforms.

http://www.rotherham.gov.uk/downloads/file/1407/independent_inquiry_cse_in_rotherham

See also…

London’s Cabbies Take Their Fight To City Hall

London Taxi Drivers Demonstration 24th September 2014

TPH Notice 09/14 – Victoria Station late night taxi rank trial

13/10/2014

Following recent taxi trade demonstrations Transport for London have issued the following notice to the trade.

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13 October 2014

On Monday 20 October 2014 a one month trial of a marshalled taxi rank will begin at Victoria Station on Terminus Place between the hours of midnight and 4am daily.

This trial has been permitted on condition of taxi drivers following the guidance set out in this notice. Unfortunately if drivers are found not following the information in this notice it is highly likely that the trial will be terminated earlier than one month without further notice. Should no issues arise during the one month trial period it is possible an extended trial will be permitted.

The temporary marshalled taxi rank will go-live on Monday 20 October 2014 and will be for up to five taxis.

It is important that taxis do not over-rank or attempt to access the rank outside of the marshalled hours as in recent months there have been significant issues at the station including drivers ignoring the banned left turn signage; bus station staff and bus drivers receiving verbal abuse and threats, taxi and bus passengers being put at risk and, in one instance, a vehicle accident. This has led to ongoing health and safety concerns for taxi and bus passengers and
drivers.

For the trial to be successful it is important that all taxi drivers observe the following:

  • Follow the instructions of the marshals at all times during the marshalled hours of 00:00 to 04:00
  • Do not attempt to access Terminus Place outside the marshalled hours  under any circumstances
  • Do not attempt to access Terminus Place if the rank is already full  during the marshalled hours
  • Do not enter into any disputes or arguments with any staff or the general public
  • Only leave Terminus Place via Buckingham Palace Road and not via the bus lanes in Terminus Place

During the trial the marshalled taxi rank will be monitored to determine whether it is operating successfully and whether arrangements can continue, on an extended trial, for a longer period. The location will also be monitored outside the marshalled hours to ensure drivers do not attempt to access the rank. If  buses, coaches or other works vehicles in the area are impeded by taxis it is  possible that the trial period will be terminated early.

Camera and on-street enforcement will remain in place to prevent issues with over-ranking or use of the banned left turn outside the marshalled hours.

During the trial taxi drivers are only permitted to make the left turn from  Buckingham Palace Road into Terminus Place between 00:00 and 04:00. Taxi drivers making the left turn outside of these times may be issued with a Penalty Charge Notice (PCN).

All drivers using the late night taxi rank are kindly asked to observe the terms and conditions set out in this notice in order to help ensure the trial is not terminated early and to increase the likelihood of an extended trial which could benefit taxi drivers and passengers.

Thank you for your cooperation.
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